Why the US military usually punishes misconduct but police often close ranks

2019-12-06 Dwight Stirling

When police are revealed to have killed an unarmed suspect or used excessive force during arrest, police generally defend those actions. Cops who report wrongdoing are routinely ostracized as “rats” and denied promotions, according to a 1998 Human Rights Watch study. Researchers identify this so-called “blue wall of silence” – the refusal to “snitch” on other officers – as a defining feature of U.S. cop culture today.

U.S. military culture stresses organizational, rather than personal, loyalty.

And the pride Marines famously feel, for instance, comes from being part of this well-respected corps. Personal relationships with other Marines are of secondary importance.

https://theconversation.com/why-the-us-military-usually-punishes-misconduct-but-police-often-close-ranks-127898

The Man Who Tried to Sell the Eiffel Tower (Twice)

2020-01-26 by Ben Carlson

“there were many stories in the local papers about the dilapidated state of the famous Eiffel Tower. A light bulb went off in Lustig’s head. He set about creating a fake government role for himself, complete with his own stationery and business cards done up with an official French seal. There was even an official-sounding, yet completely made-up title: “Deputy Director General of the Ministry of Posts and Telegraphs.” He set up shop at the Hôtel de Crillon, a stone palace on the Place de la Concorde. The biggest scrap metal dealers in town were summoned to the luxurious hotel for a secret business proposal.”

https://awealthofcommonsense.com/2020/01/the-man-who-tried-to-sell-the-eiffel-tower-twice/